What is the difference between management and leadership? It is a question that has been asked more than once and also answered in different ways. The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate the people who work or follow them, and this sets the tone for most other aspects of what they do.
Many people, by the way, are both. They have management jobs, but they realize that you cannot buy hearts, especially to follow them down a difficult path, and so act as leaders too.

Management is the process of planning and making the right decisions and continuing surveillance and control sources of institutions to reach the desired goals of the institution, through recruitment, development and control of human resources, financial and raw materials and sources of intellectual and moral integrity.

Leadership is the ability to influence and motivate individuals to do something conducive to the achievement of objectives. Leadership is one of the most important elements that must be available in the administrative person, to be the cause of achieving the goals of institutions the highest standards of efficiency and effectiveness. The direction is the essence of leadership.

Leadership vs. Management: They are not the same
Most people talk as though leadership and management is the same thing. Fundamentally, they are very different. Unfortunately, a lot of people do not understand this.
This was discovered a few years ago when doing on-site training in TQM. As part of a class exercise, participants where asked for a definition of total quality and management. Everyone got total right, there was even good consistency regarding quality. However, when it came to management, participants were all over the place. There really wasn't any consistent definition.
This confusion extends even into the business schools. In fact, professors tend to lack clarity about the fundamental differences between what a leader does and what a manager does.
One way to understand leadership versus management is to imagine a Venn diagram. Most of the time, the two do not intersect. However, certain activities require both outstanding leadership and management skills. Three examples:
Project manager. One must ably manage the resources associated allocated to the project and while exercising leadership skills to build a strong team.
Delegation. Essentially, one must plan what to do and persuade someone to do it.
Change "Management." If one is putting a new light bulb in the socket, one can management that change. However, real organizational change has both a leadership and a management component.
Playing Leader and Manager Roles
"All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts." — William Shakespeare
as You Like It)
To understand the difference, it helpful to look at a role--not the thing you eat unfortunately. A role is a fairly standardized behavior. Technically, a social role is, "An expected behavior for a given individual that relates to social status and social position."
In a family environment, a woman plays the role of mother, aunt, sister, daughter, grandmother, lover, etc. as she goes through life. A man will play complementary roles, the father, uncle, son, brother and so on.
It's important to understand, that one also plays roles at work. For example, the Dictionary of Occupational Titles has thousands listed. In the professional category, many professions such as medicine and law have even had a number of specialty roles.
Certain roles function almost as a class. These include: employees (or workers), manager, executives, entrepreneurs, investors, and stockholders. Within the executive class, we have the various c-level roles such as: the CEO, CFO, CIO, COO, and so on.
LeadershipVs Management: Understanding the Management Role
"Not one talks about managing fun and play." — Anonymous
Management focuses on work. We manage work activities such as money, time, paperwork, materials, equipment, etc. Management focuses more on:
Resource use
Time management
Logistics and the supply chain
Finance and money management
Decision Making
Problem Solving
The first five (planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and coordinating) are often listed in the management 101 texts as the major functions of management. Certain conceptual skills such as decision making, strategy development, and problem solving seem to fit better in management verses the leadership area, but you can go either way..
Some professors like to say "Managers are decision makers." but that doesn't seem quite right. A better description is, "Executives are decision makers— managers are problem solvers."
However, some things some things should be managed and others should not. People should not be managed—it implies we threat them like a thing.
Leadership Vs Management: Understanding the Leadership Role
"I don't like to be managed. But if you lead me, I'll follow you anywhere." — A comment heard in the halls of a large corporation
Leadership is hard to understand, there are so many definitions, some of them bad ones. Leadership has an essential focus on people and how they can be influenced. Leader’s focus more on:
Team work
One can add to the list activities such as: