As any other department, HR has a manager or administrator who is in charge to control the department.
I. Human resource administration refers to the managing of human capital within an organization or industry. Once called “personnel management,” “human resources” is leading the way for improving the overall employment experience for billions of hard-working professionals around the world. In addition, human resource administration provides the business strategy by which organizations can meet the demands of the future.
As seen that the main responsibility is dealing with people (human being) and all attachments.
In many organizations, human resource administration is handled by a team of human resources professionals headed by a senior human resources director. The duties of the members of the team can range from recruiting and employee relations to payroll and benefits administration. The entire team works together to achieve the human resources goals of the organization under the direction of the human resources manager.
For the best results, human resource administration should be closely linked with the executive management of an organization. Each department must communicate the personnel needs and goals of the company on a regular basis so that the human resources division can best support the objectives of the organization. Without continual communication and resources, any organization can face shortages of skilled staff to handle the many responsibilities in departments, resulting in low performance.
Human resource administration of today requires trained individuals who have the personality traits and the commitment to providing expert support. When planning a human resources strategy, it's best for organizations to look for human resources professionals who have the education and experience to manage the complex issues that human resources departments often face. In addition, human resources divisions must stay on top of employment and legal trends in order to best protect the companies they serve.
Due to its importance and as seen above, HR management should have strategies, knowledge and forecast in order to run properly and effectively the department which is handling one of the most sensitive important sources. Otherwise results will be with high costs and efficiency.
II. Best strategies for effective HR management:

Human resources” (HR) covers all aspects of employee management, such as recruiting, hiring, training, retaining and firing. Within each specific area, there are proven effective human resource management strategies. Since workers are a much-needed resource in any company, successful management HR techniques are required for a productive team environment to occur that can create the profits the firm needs to stay in business. Finding and developing employees takes time as well as money since a HR staff must be paid for; not using effective human resource management strategies can be costly for a business.

a. Time-saving recruiting strategies include initial job interviews done using a telephone screening. During a phone screening interview, a human resources worker, using notes from the hiring manager, will conduct a conversation with prospective employees. He or she will ask key questions designed by the manager to screen out, or eliminate, applicants who aren't seen as a good fit for the position. This way, the manager's time is saved because he or she will only have a short list of applicants to interview himself or herself in person.
b. Streamlined hiring processes are another one of the most effective human resource management strategies. The HR department can ensure that all the paperwork needed to comply with the law is ready for each new hire. The quick processing of insurance and other forms means that new workers waste minimal time getting prepared to work and can start being productive much sooner. Ensuring that all employees receive adequate on-the-job training is an important strategy. If workers are unsure of what their exact job role is, or are inept at completing it, this can affect other employees and departments, causing a less productive and more stressful workplace.

c. Paying for employees to take relevant courses or programs can be one of the most effective human resource management strategies for creating both competent and satisfied workers. Free education allows employees to develop and grow personally as well as on the job. Feeling that the company sees them as worth investing in by supporting their educational goals, these employees are more likely to want to stay with the company rather than quitting to join the competition who isn't offering free, valuable training and education.

d. Maintaining the communication and updates through all the departments in order to deal quickly with any complaint or needs. Any new hired employee might take some time to get adapted to the whole company’s atmosphere, or at least to the department where he/she works. Therefore it is very important to be “in touch” with those employees to follow up.
Not just creating, but maintaining, a competent work force is a crucial employer strategy. Having high employee turnover is not only seen as a negative to a company's reputation, but it's also an inefficient use of human resources. If a business can't keep its staff, the HR department and hiring managers must spend too much company time trying to recruit and train new employees to fit into the organization.
- Payroll: The term 'payroll' encompasses every employee of a company who receives a regular wage or other compensation. Some employees may be paid a steady salary while others are paid for hours worked or the number of items produced. All of these different payment methods are calculated by a payroll specialist and the appropriate paychecks are issued. Companies often use objective measuring tools such as timecards or timesheets completed by supervisors to determine the total amount of payroll due each pay period.
- A business strategy typically is a document that clearly articulates the direction a business will pursue and the steps it will take to achieve its goals. In a standard business plan, the business strategy results from goals established to support the stated mission of the business. A typical business strategy is developed in three steps: analysis, integration and implementation.
- Employee turnover is a ratio comparison of the number of employees a company must replace in a given time period to the average number of total employees. A huge concern to most companies, employee turnover is a costly expense especially in lower paying job roles, for which the employee turnover rate is highest. Many factors play a role in the employee turnover rate of any company, and these can stem from both the employer and the employees. Wages, company benefits, employee attendance, and job performance are all factors that play a significant role in employee turnover.